Monthly Archives: March 2012

Recent Hearing Loss Statistics

Research on hearing loss indicates:

  • 10% of all Americans have some hearing loss
  • 14% of American adults have “a little trouble hearing”
  • 3.4% of American adults have “a lot of trouble hearing” or are deaf
  • 30% of all people over the age of 65 have hearing loss
  • 65% of all people over the age of 85 have hearing loss
  • Over 75% of people with hearing loss lost their hearing after the age of 19
  • 50% of people with hearing loss are of working age (18 – 64)
  • 83 out of every 1000 children in the United States have an educationally significant hearing loss
  • 3 of every 1000 babies born in the United States has a hearing loss
  • 75% of people who could benefit from hearing aids are not using them

Gallaudet Research Institute
http://clerccenter.gallaudet.edu/InfoToGo/

National Center for Health Statistics
http://www.cdc.gov/nchs

Disclaimer:
The information and reference materials included on this website are intended solely for the general information and education purposes of the reader. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice or to diagnose health problems. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to discuss the information presented here.

How To Get the Best Results From Your Hearing Aid

The best way to achieve maximum benefit with hearing aids is to wear them whenever you’re awake, not just when you think you ‘need to hear’.  Those who wear them inconsistently don’t hear as well in different listening situations as those who wear them all the time.

Using your hearing aid only occasionally just sets you up for unnecessary frustration.  Adjusting to the different quality of sound you will hear takes time and practice.  Think of it like your golf or tennis swing—if you only play every now and then, you’ll be out of practice and won’t enjoy the experience.  Your clubs, your racket or your hearing aids will get tossed in the closet.  The more you practice, whether on the course, the court or in listening with your hearing aid, the better you’ll perform and the more satisfied you’ll be.

Disclaimer:
The information and reference materials included on this website are intended solely for the general information and education purposes of the reader. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice or to diagnose health problems. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to discuss the information presented here.

Could You Have Hearing Loss?

  • Do you often feel that people are mumbling or not speaking clearly and have to ask them to speak up or repeat?
  • Do you find it difficult to follow conversation in a noisy restaurant or crowded room?
  • Do you experience ringing noises in your ears?
  • Do you hear better with one ear than with the other?
  • Have you been exposed regularly to loud noise at work, during recreation or in military service?
  • Do people tell you that you play the TV or radio too loudly?
  • Do you sometimes fail to hear your doorbell or telephone?
  • Do you find it difficult to understand a speaker at a public meeting or religious service?

If you answered YES to two or more of the above questions, you may have some hearing loss. Please call for an appointment 904.399.0350 if you suspect that you or a family member may be experiencing some loss of hearing.

Disclaimer:
The information and reference materials included on this website are intended solely for the general information and education purposes of the reader. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice or to diagnose health problems. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to discuss the information presented here.

Spotlight: Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo

Got vertigo?  Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (or BPPV) is one of the most common causes of the disorienting sensation of spinning or whirling.   It is caused by a disorder of the balance center of the inner ear; specifically the displacement of the calcium carbonate crystals that are normally found there.  These crystals play an important role in sensing various head movements.  When they become dislodged from their normal location, they cause abnormal irritation. With subsequent head movements, such as rolling over in bed or looking upwards, these “relocated” crystals will bring on feelings of vertigo.

Treatment for BPPV involves specialized positioning maneuvers, called the ‘Epley’ procedure, that are done in the office.  These can be effective in up to 80% of cases and are very well-tolerated. In rare situations, surgery may be required to help stop repeated episodes of positional vertigo.

BPPV is extremely common in people over 50.  The precise cause is usually not known, but degenerative changes in the inner ear are one possible explanation. BPPV will commonly occur in patients that have sustained a head injury, or in those who have suffered from a viral inner ear infection, such as vestibular neuritis or labyrinthitis.

Disclaimer:
The information and reference materials included on this website are intended solely for the general information and education purposes of the reader. They are not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice or to diagnose health problems. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to discuss the information presented here.