Monthly Archives: August 2012

Audiology Credentials…what do all those letters mean?!

Patients are often confused by the series of acronyms and abbreviations listed after their audiologist’s name. Listed below are common abbreviations used and a description of what they mean.

  • Au.D.: Au.D. is the abbreviation for Doctor of Audiology. Beginning in 2007, many states adopted the Au.D. as the entry level degree required to practice Audiology. Prior to the Au.D., a master’s degree was required for clinical practice. There are no longer any professional training programs offering a master’s degree in Audiology. To obtain an Au.D., you must obtain a bachelor’s degree and complete four years of graduate school.
  • CCC-A: CCC-A stands for Certificate of Clinical Competency in Audiology. This is a voluntary certificate issued by the American Speech Language and Hearing Association (ASHA). Professionals who have been awarded the CCC-A have completed a rigorous academic program and a supervised clinical experience and have passed a national examination.
  • F-AAA: F-AAA is the abbreviation used to delineate those audiologists who are Fellows of the American Academy of Audiology. The American Academy of Audiology is the world’s largest professional organization of, by, and for audiologists. The active membership of more than 11,000 is dedicated to providing quality hearing care services through professional development, education, research, and increased public awareness of hearing and balance disorders.
  • ABA: If an audiologist uses the abbreviation “ABA” after their name, they have been awarded board certification in Audiology by the American Board of Audiology. To become board certified in audiology, one must maintain continuing education credits above and beyond what is simply required for clinical practice. ABA certification demonstrates a commitment to excellence through lifelong learning.

At JHBI, all of our audiologists have their CCC-A, are Fellows of the American Academy of Audiology, and are board certified in Audiology by the American Board of Audiology. When you visit our office Audiology care, rest assured that you will be seen by a professional with extensive training who has demonstrated a commitment to maintaining the highest levels of professional competency.

Hearing Loss: The Largest Disability in the Country?

Data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show that about 37 million people in the United States have a hearing loss. According to a recent article by CNN’s Jen Christensen, if hearing loss were officially considered a disability, it would rank as the largest disability class in the country.

Though hearing aids are the most widely used treatment for hearing loss, only about 20% of people who need a hearing aid actually get one. One of the biggest obstacles to treatment with hearing aids is cost. Unfortunately, most private insurance plans do not include hearing aid benefits, so most patients are forced to pay for hearing aids out of pocket.

Read below for more information on hearing loss, the “invisible disability”, and the current status of hearing aids as they relate to insurance coverage.

http://www.cnn.com/2012/07/10/health/hearing-aid-insurance/index.html?hpt=hp_c2

 

Ear Candling: Ineffective and Dangerous

Proper removal of cerumen (ear wax) is a topic that is frequently misunderstood by patients. One of the most dangerous techniques people employ to remove ear wax is known as ear candling. Ear candling is a dangerous and ineffective method of ear wax removal. For more information on ear candling, its myths, and proper ear wax removal techniques, please refer to the following article from the American Academy of Audiology.

http://www.audiology.org/news/Pages/20100622.aspx

Boomers Benefit from Hearing Aids, Stay in the Workforce Longer

Today’s workforce features a changing demographic of aging employees. Between 2006 and 2016, the number of workers in the mature age group is expected to grow by 80 percent, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Many people are staying in the workforce longer due to tough economic times, in turn requiring hearing healthcare professionals to help keep those people as successful and productive as possible.

So what does this mean for the general public? It means people need to take charge of their health, including their hearing, so they can age productively and continue being successful at their jobs. Boomers should get their hearing checked routinely, and address any hearing loss as soon as possible.

According to the Better Hearing Institute, more than 34 million Americans suffer from hearing loss (about 11 percent of the U.S. population), and 60 percent of them are below retirement age. The vast majority of people with hearing loss can most likely benefit from hearing aids. Employers must also recognize the changing demographics of the workforce and make efforts to help maintain their valued employees, by encouraging healthy hearing habits.

If you have any questions regarding hearing loss, please contact our office at 904-399-0350.

How Can Bluetooth Technology Help You With Your Hearing Aids?

Did you know that some of the latest Bluetooth technology can be used with hearing aids? Learn how from one of our audiologists, Dr. Jacqueline Olson, who was featured recently in a live segment on First Coast Living in Jacksonville, Fla.