Category Archives: Better Hearing

How Can Bluetooth Technology Help You With Your Hearing Aids?

Did you know that some of the latest Bluetooth technology can be used with hearing aids? Learn how from one of our audiologists, Dr. Jacqueline Olson, who was featured recently in a live segment on First Coast Living in Jacksonville, Fla.

What Makes Us Different from Other Hearing Aid Companies?

Find out more from one of our audiologists, Dr. Jacqueline Olson, who was featured recently in a live segment on First Coast Living in Jacksonville, Fla.

 

Ringing in the Ears

We’ve all had it at one time or another–that sound of ringing in your ears—that can range from subtle to shattering.  Tinnitus (TIN-ih-tuss) is the medical term for the perception of sound in one or both ears when there is actually no external sound present.  It can come and go or be constant, and causes vary.

Common causes of tinnitus:

  • Hearing loss.   Whether age-related or caused by exposure to loud sound, hearing loss can cause tinnitus.  Tinnitus caused by short-term exposure, such as attending a loud concert, usually goes away.
  • Earwax blockage. When too much earwax builds up, it can cause hearing loss or irritation of the eardrum, which can lead to tinnitus.
  • Ear bone changes. Stiffening of the bones in your middle ear may affect your hearing and cause tinnitus. This condition tends to run in families.

Less common causes include:

  • Meniere’s disease, an inner ear disorder
  • Stress and depression are often associated with tinnitus and seem to aggravate it.
  • TMJ disorders are problems with the temperomandibular joint –where your lower jawbone meets your skull.
  • Ear or sinus infections, but once the infection is healed the tinnitus goes away.
  • Head or neck injuries
  • Acoustic neuroma, a noncancerous tumor in your brain

Some medications will trigger tinnitus as a side effect.  Fortunately, it usually disappears when you stop using these drugs.

  • Antibiotics, including chloramphenicol, erythromycin, gentamicin, vancomycin and bleomycin
  • Cancer medications, including mechlorethamine and vincristine
  • Diuretics (water pills)
  • Quinine and Chloroquine, taken for malaria
  • Aspirin in very high doses (12 or more a day)

Get Started With Hearing Aids

It’s so gradual that you may not even realize you have hearing loss.  You begin to strain to hear loved ones and avoid noisy restaurants.  Not only does your hearing deteriorate, but also your lifestyle, relationships, and general psychological well-being. The sooner you begin treatment for hearing loss, the easier it will be to adjust to hearing aids and to retain some hearing ability.

1.  See an audiologist

If you have noticed any symptoms of hearing loss (or your friends or family have noticed) you may be among the one in five Americans 1 suffering with this problem.  Seeing an audiologist is the first step in evaluating your hearing loss and how it may be treated.

Jacksonville Hearing and Balance Institute audiologists have doctoral degrees and are board certified by the American Board of Audiology. They specialize in fitting hearing aids and work with patients and physicians to create effective hearing solutions.  Our Hearing Center is a state-of-the-art facility dedicated exclusively to serving our hearing aid and cochlear implant patients.

2.  Get educated

Being informed about your hearing health and the many treatment options available is essential.  Web searches, books, and consulting friends and family are an important part of the learning process.  Besides the professional and personal one-on-one assistance of our team members, we also provide a number of resources that can help you determine the best hearing solution for you and your lifestyle.

3.  Take charge of your hearing

Hearing aids come in many styles and have various features.  Jacksonville Hearing and Balance Institute team members listen to individual needs and lifestyle when determining the right hearing aid for you.  Things to consider include:

  • Type of hearing loss
  • Severity of hearing loss
  • Size and shape of the ear and ear canal
  • Patient preference
  • Patient dexterity
  • Financial investment

Don’t miss out another minute!  Contact us to set up a hearing consultation or come into our new Hearing Center on Thursdays in May for a free hearing screening!

1 According to a study by Johns Hopkins researchers, published in Nov. 14, 2011 Archives of Internal Medicine

Hears to Thursdays!

JHBI Opens State-of-the-Art Hearing Center

Jacksonville Hearing and Balance Institute has just announced the opening of a brand new, state-of-the-art Hearing Center. The 1,180 square foot Hearing Center is located right across the hall from our existing offices in the Center One building on Centurion Parkway North just off Gate Parkway.

The Hearing Center will be dedicated exclusively to serving our hearing aid and cochlear implant patients. The center features three new exam rooms, a new testing room and a waiting area with the loop system.

Join us for “Better Hearing Thursdays!” in May (May 10th, 17th, 24th, 31st) between 9am-noon for a free hearing screening, video-otoscope session, gift bag and tour of the new Hearing Center with an audiologist! Let us know you are coming; reserve your Thursday!*

*Offer only valid through the month of May.

May is Better Hearing Month

May is Better Hearing Month

In an effort to raise public awareness for the growing number of Americans suffering from hearing loss, May has been designated Better Hearing Month.

On average, most Americans consider hearing loss a condition that is simply associated with aging, and don’t know how to recognize the condition or who is qualified to diagnose and treat it. “Hearing loss can be caused by all kinds of things:  loud noises, ear infections or disease,  certain medications, and just normal aging,” explains Dr. J. Douglas Green, Jr.. founder  of Jacksonville Hearing and Balance Institute.   “It can affect patients of all ages—children, teens, adults, and the elderly.”

The first step in treatment of a hearing problem is a hearing evaluation by an audiologist. An audiologist is a highly educated and clinically experienced health-care professional who specializes in evaluating, diagnosing, and treating people with hearing loss and balance disorders. JHBI’s audiologists have areas of expertise that include, but are not limited to:

  • Performing hearing evaluations
  • Prescribing and fitting hearing aids
  • Conducting cochlear implant programming and counseling
  • Providing hearing rehabilitation training such as:
    • Auditory training
    • Speech reading
    • Listening skills improvement
    • Assistive listening device fitting and dispensing

You may need to see an audiologist if you have trouble hearing conversation in noisy environments, are unable to hear people talk without looking at them, or have constant ringing or pain in your ears.   Although most hearing loss is permanent, an audiologist can determine the best treatment, which may include hearing aids, assistive listening devices, and hearing rehabilitation.

Take advantage of our Free Hearing Screenings on Thursdays in May!  For more information or to schedule a consultation, contact us.

 

CenterOne Featured in Florida DOCTOR

Florida DOCTOR has featured Dr. Doug Green and CenterOne Surgery Center and its mission of providing high quality, cost effective outpatient surgery to the community.  “CenterOne Surgery Center started with a group of doctors who really cared about providing the best quality of care and service,” says Dr. Green, one of its founding physicians and founder of Jacksonville Hearing and Balance Institute.  “We all had the same vision.”

Surgical specialties available at CenterOne include orthopedics, pain management, pediatric/adult ENT, neurosurgery, podiatry, otology/neurotology, urology, plastic surgery, hand surgery, general surgery and more.  CenterOne has been awarded the certificate of accreditation from the Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care (AAAHC).  It is contracted with all major insurance carriers and is fully licensed by the state of Florida and certified by Medicare. Read the entire Florida DOCTOR article.

Recent Hearing Loss Statistics

Research on hearing loss indicates:

  • 10% of all Americans have some hearing loss
  • 14% of American adults have “a little trouble hearing”
  • 3.4% of American adults have “a lot of trouble hearing” or are deaf
  • 30% of all people over the age of 65 have hearing loss
  • 65% of all people over the age of 85 have hearing loss
  • Over 75% of people with hearing loss lost their hearing after the age of 19
  • 50% of people with hearing loss are of working age (18 – 64)
  • 83 out of every 1000 children in the United States have an educationally significant hearing loss
  • 3 of every 1000 babies born in the United States has a hearing loss
  • 75% of people who could benefit from hearing aids are not using them

Gallaudet Research Institute
http://clerccenter.gallaudet.edu/InfoToGo/

National Center for Health Statistics
http://www.cdc.gov/nchs

Disclaimer:
The information and reference materials included on this website are intended solely for the general information and education purposes of the reader. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice or to diagnose health problems. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to discuss the information presented here.

How To Get the Best Results From Your Hearing Aid

The best way to achieve maximum benefit with hearing aids is to wear them whenever you’re awake, not just when you think you ‘need to hear’.  Those who wear them inconsistently don’t hear as well in different listening situations as those who wear them all the time.

Using your hearing aid only occasionally just sets you up for unnecessary frustration.  Adjusting to the different quality of sound you will hear takes time and practice.  Think of it like your golf or tennis swing—if you only play every now and then, you’ll be out of practice and won’t enjoy the experience.  Your clubs, your racket or your hearing aids will get tossed in the closet.  The more you practice, whether on the course, the court or in listening with your hearing aid, the better you’ll perform and the more satisfied you’ll be.

Disclaimer:
The information and reference materials included on this website are intended solely for the general information and education purposes of the reader. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice or to diagnose health problems. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to discuss the information presented here.