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Coming Up: Balance Awareness Week

Balance Awareness Week is September 16th – 22nd, 2012. The Vestibular Disorders Association (VEDA) is launching a campaign to “Defeat Dizziness” through public education and advocacy. Read below for the official press release from VEDA about its 16th annual Balance Awareness Week. Since 1997, JHBI has been helping patients with balance disorders through advanced testing techniques and proper diagnosis.

VESTIBULAR DISORDERS ASSOCIATION SEEKS TO “DEFEAT DIZZINESS” DURING BALANCE AWARENESS WEEK

PORTLAND, OR — The Vestibular Disorders Association (VEDA) celebrates its 16th annual Balance Awareness Week September 16th – 22nd, 2012 by launching a campaign to “Defeat Dizziness” through public education and advocacy.

The vestibular system includes the parts of the inner ear and brain that process the sensory information involved with controlling balance and eye movements.

Illness, injury, and even aging can damage the fragile vestibular organs, and with them, the ability to balance. As many as 35% of adults aged 40 years or older in the United States — approximately 69 million Americans — have experienced some form of vestibular dysfunction.

Receiving effective treatment is frequently complicated by the length of time it takes to diagnose a vestibular disorder, which can be a year or more in many cases. Most vestibular patients visit a doctor 4-5 times before receiving an accurate diagnosis.

In addition to affecting balance, vestibular disorders often provide disabling symptoms that include vertigo, dizziness, hearing and vision problems, and difficulty concentrating. These life-altering symptoms can deeply inhibit a person’s ability to perform basic day-to-day tasks, and are compounded by their invisibility to others, making it difficult to understand that a person with vestibular dysfunction is profoundly struggling to remain oriented and functional.

The goal of Balance Awareness Week is to “defeat dizziness” by helping people recognize the symptoms of a vestibular disorder, and urging them to seek help from a professional vestibular specialist. In addition, VEDA encourages the friends, family and coworkers of those suffering from a vestibular disorder to learn more about how balance dysfunction can impact their loved one’s ability to perform common day-to-day activities.

Fitter International, Inc. (“Fitterfirst”) — a company that designs and distributes fitness products focused on improving the functional elements of balance — is sponsoring Balance Awareness Week.

“Balance is the essence of movement and movement is the essence of life,” says Louis Stack, Founder and President of Fitterfirst, who is sponsoring Balance Awareness Week. “As a competitive athlete I recognize how important core balance is, not only during physical activity but even for everyday functions of life. At Fitterfirst we produce easy to use balance tools that help people maintain or regain better balance for active daily living.”

VEDA invites everyone to participate in Balance Awareness Week — go to www.vestibular.org/BAW to learn more about how you can help.

About VEDA: For over 25 years, the Vestibular Disorders Association has provided objective information, advocacy, and a caring support network to people with vestibular disorders and the health professionals who treat them. For more information, visit www.vestibular.org or call (800) 837-8428.

Audiology Credentials…what do all those letters mean?!

Patients are often confused by the series of acronyms and abbreviations listed after their audiologist’s name. Listed below are common abbreviations used and a description of what they mean.

  • Au.D.: Au.D. is the abbreviation for Doctor of Audiology. Beginning in 2007, many states adopted the Au.D. as the entry level degree required to practice Audiology. Prior to the Au.D., a master’s degree was required for clinical practice. There are no longer any professional training programs offering a master’s degree in Audiology. To obtain an Au.D., you must obtain a bachelor’s degree and complete four years of graduate school.
  • CCC-A: CCC-A stands for Certificate of Clinical Competency in Audiology. This is a voluntary certificate issued by the American Speech Language and Hearing Association (ASHA). Professionals who have been awarded the CCC-A have completed a rigorous academic program and a supervised clinical experience and have passed a national examination.
  • F-AAA: F-AAA is the abbreviation used to delineate those audiologists who are Fellows of the American Academy of Audiology. The American Academy of Audiology is the world’s largest professional organization of, by, and for audiologists. The active membership of more than 11,000 is dedicated to providing quality hearing care services through professional development, education, research, and increased public awareness of hearing and balance disorders.
  • ABA: If an audiologist uses the abbreviation “ABA” after their name, they have been awarded board certification in Audiology by the American Board of Audiology. To become board certified in audiology, one must maintain continuing education credits above and beyond what is simply required for clinical practice. ABA certification demonstrates a commitment to excellence through lifelong learning.

At JHBI, all of our audiologists have their CCC-A, are Fellows of the American Academy of Audiology, and are board certified in Audiology by the American Board of Audiology. When you visit our office Audiology care, rest assured that you will be seen by a professional with extensive training who has demonstrated a commitment to maintaining the highest levels of professional competency.

How Can Bluetooth Technology Help You With Your Hearing Aids?

Did you know that some of the latest Bluetooth technology can be used with hearing aids? Learn how from one of our audiologists, Dr. Jacqueline Olson, who was featured recently in a live segment on First Coast Living in Jacksonville, Fla.

How to Measure Your Potential for Hearing Loss this Fourth of July

Noise is one of the most common occupational illnesses in the United States, and one of the most common causes of hearing loss. According to the Better Hearing Institute, 30 million Americans are exposed to dangerous noise levels each day, and 10 million people have already suffered irreversible hearing damage from noise. Because the damage often takes place gradually, the effects of noise on hearing are often underestimated.

This Fourth of July, Jacksonville Hearing and Balance Institute is urging Americans to protect their hearing by enjoying fireworks from a comfortable distance and wearing disposable earplugs, made of foam or silicone, which are usually available at local pharmacies.

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Excessive noise damages the delicate hair cells in the inner ear. Working in noisy occupations or participating in loud recreational activities can involve dangerous levels of noise. Beware of activities such as music concerts, shooting a gun, sporting events, motorcycles and fire crackers. Firefighters, police officers, factory workers, construction workers, musicians and military personnel are particularly at risk for hearing loss due to exposure to noise.

If you suspect that you or a loved one may be experiencing noise-induced hearing loss, contact our office at 904-399-0350 to schedule your evaluation.

 

 

 

 

 

JHBI pleased to offer Panasonic’s award-winning hearing instrument

Panasonic Corporation has received the prestigious Good Housekeeping Seal for the company’s JZ Series digital hearing instruments, after evaluation by the Good Housekeeping Research Institute.  [Read the full press release.] The newly designed hearing instrument resembles an MP3 player, is palm-sized and features an LCD screen and an earphone with microphones.  It was specifically created for increased usability and comfort, ideal for individuals with dexterity challenges, impaired vision and situational hearing loss, like when watching TV.

Since 1909, the Seal has been granted to products that have been submitted to and evaluated by the Good Housekeeping Research Institute. As part of Good Housekeeping’s policy, if a product receiving the Seal proves to be defective within two years from the date it was first sold to a consumer by an authorized retailer, Good Housekeeping will replace the product or refund the purchase price.

JHBI is pleased to offer this product as one of many available solutions to hearing loss.

God, if I can just hear pitch again…

Dr. Green gives God all the credit for Barry Blazs’ miraculous recovery in this 700 Club featured story. Expected not to survive a serious motorcycle accident in 2004, Barry, a worship leader and musician, is able to rejoice.